Saturday, August 18, 2012

California Apostille Information

California Apostille Information

Los Angeles Notary Public
Authentication Information
Apostille or Certification
The California Secretary of State provides authentication of public official signatures on documents to be used outside the United States of America. The country of destination determines whether the authentication is an Apostille or Certification.
  • The California Secretary of State can only authenticate documents issued in the State of California by the following public officials and their deputies:
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County Clerks or Recorders
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Executive Officers
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Court Administrators
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Judges of the Superior Court
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Executive Clerks
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Officers whose authority is not limited to any particular county
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State Officials
  • Some examples of documents submitted for authentications are:
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Bylaws
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Papers for adoption purposes
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Certificates of Non-Marital Status
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Powers of Attorney
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Corporate documents such as articles, mergers, amendments, etc.
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School records such as diplomas, transcripts, letters relating to degrees, etc.
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Deeds of Assignment
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References and Job Certification
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Distributorship Agreements
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Trademarks
  • Documents submitted to the Secretary of State for authentication must be currently certified by the appropriate public official or must be notarized by a Los Angeles Notary Public.

    Customers requiring authentication of any school records (e.g., college transcripts) must obtain a notarized copy of the record from the high school, university, etc., before submitting the documents for authentication. Learn more about Apostille for school diploma.

    Any document executed by County Health Officers and County Local Registrars can be authenticated only if the document is first certified by the county clerk/recorder.
General Information
  • In 1961 many nations joined together to create a simplified method of "legalizing" documents for universal recognition. Members of the conference, referred to as the Hague Convention, adopted a document referred to as an Apostille that would be recognized by all member nations.

    Documents sent to member nations, completed with an Apostille at the state level, may be submitted directly to the member nation without further action.

    Documents sent to non-member nations requiring a Certification of the signature of the state’s public official at the state level, then must be transmitted to the Authentication Office of the Department of State in Washington, D.C. for the Authentication of the State Official’s signature.

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